Mehdi Hasan's muddle on Iran

What do we do about Iran? In effect, Mehdi Hasan’s answer is nothing. Which may be fine if you’re Mehdi Hasan. But it’s not quite so fine for the rest of us

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So what do we do about Iran? Don't ask Mehdi Hasan
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Paul Staines
On 19 March 2012 08:09

Poor Mehdi Hasan. His New Statesman blog is billed as a “polemical take on politics, economics and foreign affairs.“ No-one likes a good polemic more than I do. It’s just that to be effective, it helps if you have a consistent approach to what you’re talking about.

And so to the debate about Iran’s nuclear weapons programme. Hasan can’t make up his mind whether his strategy is to deny its existence or to allow it to progress to completion.

More of that in a moment. But first there’s some fun to be had. In an article last Tuesday Hasan took me to task for tweeting him about Israel’s attack on Iraq’s nuclear facility at Osiraq in 1981. The reactor was destroyed and Saddam’s nuclear programme was halted in its tracks.

It’s an obvious historical reference point for anyone seriously contemplating military action to stop the deranged Islamist theocracy in Tehran getting nuclear weapons. For the equal and opposite reason it’s also obvious why apologists for said deranged-Islamist-theocracy feel the need to completely misrepresent its significance.

Enter Mehdi Hasan with his call for me to “stick to blogging about bond markets and deficits and stay away from foreign affairs and, in particular, the Middle East.“ Fair enough, but what’s he going to tell Bill Clinton (you know, former president of the United States and all that), speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos in 2005, who said “...everybody talks about what the Israelis did at Osiraq, in 1981, which, I think, in retrospect, was a really good thing. You know, it kept Saddam from developing nuclear power.“ The point is uncontestable, as long as you are clear about what is being claimed.

Hasan obviously isn’t which is why he devotes much of his article to weirdly diversionary arguments on the questions of whether the strike on Osiraq encouraged Saddam to redouble his efforts, this time taking his nuclear programme underground.

But that’s irrelevant to the issue at hand which is how one assesses the balance of risk and reward prior to adopting a course of action, and what can reasonably be expected to be achieved right now. You can never know in advance of any given action precisely what the consequences will be. Nor can you know what the world would have looked like had you not taken such action. (That’s logic Mehdi; go take a class in it.)

The Israelis looked at Saddam Hussein – almost as big a Jew-hating fanatic as the warmongers in Tehran – saw he was building a nuclear capability, and rightly decided it was far too risky to allow Iraq to proceed. Any threat of weaponisation arising from Osiraq was eliminated along with the facility. That’s my claim, and that’s hard to refute.

Eight Israeli F-16s destroyed five years of work in less than 90 seconds. On 8 June 1981, Iraq was once again years away from obtaining a nuclear weapon. Of course, the magnificently executed attack on Osiraq did not mean Saddam would not have another go at acquiring nuclear weapons. And when he did have another go he was obviously going to do it as covertly as possible.

The best one may be able to hope for in such circumstances is that one delays a dangerous regime’s acquisition of nuclear weapons until it is finally overthrown and replaced by something less unpalatable. Via a long and circuitous route at great cost in blood and treasure that is actually what happened in Iraq, and it shows why a policy of regime change is vital in and of itself but also as a complement to any military attack.

Now, I’m curious about something. I would never accuse Mehdi Hasan of being completely out of his depth, ignorant of basic facts or deliberately distorting a picture so as to produce a convenient outcome. But I do have a couple of questions for him about his article.

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