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Only 6% realise debt is still rising

Debt is rising and the public is unaware - do we blame politicians, the media, both, or the public themselves?

by The Commentator on 5 December 2012 10:03

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A new ITV-ComRes poll published yesterday provided the stunning statistic that just 6 percent of the British public are aware that debt in the UK is still rising.

Against a backdrop of 'cuts' and demonstrations as a result of 'cuts', the public has evidently been misled by the plethora of left-wing commentators and spin regard what the British Coalition government is doing in economic terms.

Public net debt is still on the rise, providing a rational for further cuts in public spending and perhaps, as is expected in the Chancellor's Autumn Statement today, more incentives for private sector investment in Britain.

49 percent of people polled thought the government is slashing the national debt by £600bn between 2010 and 2015, 14 percent of people thought it would stay the same, while 31 percent said they didn’t know.

Allister Heath writes in today's CityAM: "Yesterday’s ITV poll also showed that just 21 per cent of the public thinks that the chancellor’s economic plan is right for the country, with 45 per cent disagreeing and 34 per cent unable to express a view. The sceptics may have a point, of course, but given that just six per cent actually understand Osborne’s plan’s key element, how can anybody be possibly expressing an informed view?"

Today's Autumn Statement provides the Chancellor, and the media, with the opportunity to convey to the country that this is not actually the case, and that the much vaunted 'slash' in public spending is indeed little more than a plaster for a bullet wound. The question remains as to whether he will indeed manage to convince the public that more cuts are needed.

Read more on: public spending, Autumn Statement, UK debt deficit, UK debt, City AM, deficits, UK deficit, economics, and ITV
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