Did Brussels corrupt Italian democracy?

Barroso is a civil servant, unelected by anyone, and it seems he was engaged in the political murder of the leader of a European nation

by Tim Hedges on 5 August 2013 09:37

There is an extraordinary story doing the rounds in Italy which, if true, will prompt widespread concern all over Europe. Open Europe, the think tank, refers to an article by Fabrizio Goria in the online newspaper Linkiesta, and this is picked up by the London School of Economics blog.

Goria claims the story originated with Ferruccio de Bortoli, a very senior journalist and director of the Corriere della Sera, a major newspaper in Italy. It concerns the downfall, in November 2011, of Silvio Berlusconi.

The trouble can be said to have begun at the G20 meeting in Cannes, held on 3rd and 4th November. At a joint press conference with Angela Merkel and Nicolas Sarkozy, a journalist asked about Silvio Berlusconi and the two giggled, as if the third largest country in the Eurozone were a joke.

Back in Rome a couple of days later, at an internal meeting, the then Minister for the Interior Roberto Maroni (now head of the Northern League party and President of Lombardy) received a phone call from José Manuel Barroso, head of the European Commission and those present said he went white.

Barroso is reported to have said ‘I don’t want you to take this personally. Neither you nor all other members of the Government. But you need to ‘unplug’ Berlusconi.’ The policy would be one of continual declarations against Berlusconi from all parts of the European Union, its national leaders and functionaries.

Within ten days Berlusconi had gone and President Napolitano had appointed Mario Monti.

Now, most observers saw the hand of the Eurozone in Berlusconi’s undoing. But this, if true, is a new development. Barroso is a civil servant, unelected by anyone, and it seems he was engaged in the political murder of the leader of a European nation. Say what you like about Berlusconi, he had been fairly elected and was three and a half years into his five year term.

And yet Barroso calls another elected politician, Maroni, and says Italy’s Prime Minister has to go. The story tells us that the unelected Barroso expected to be obeyed and that the elected Maroni took the instruction seriously.

Makes you think, doesn’t it?

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