Swedish court finds drug smuggler's defence that 7 kilos of cannabis was ordinary grass for the garden "unlikely"

Judges hear some pretty strange defences, but this one takes the (hash) cake. Drug smuggler intimated her "grass" was not for drug use, but to plant a classic English-style lawn

by the commentator on 24 December 2013 22:04

Cannabis_garden

The ever fascinating Swedish newspaper, The Local has just run a crime story that may not break a record for the absurdity of the defence, but does come close.

The paper said on Tuesday: "A woman caught smuggling seven kilogrammes of cannabis into Sweden [on a train] has claimed that she thought it was "grass" for the garden," a court heard.

The paper went on: "Malmö District Court found this explanation unlikely and jailed the woman for two years and three months.

"The woman was stopped on the train plying the route from Copenhagen [Denmark] to Malmö by customs officials in February. She was carrying a purple bag which contained the contraband...

"The cannabis weighed in at 7.4 kilos and the woman admitted straight away that she was carrying "grass". But she claimed she had no idea that the find concerned a narcotic." She was apparently suggesting she was planning to plant a classic, English-style lawn of the kind made famous by the estates of the English Royal Family, a Swedish journalist following the trial said.

She said she was carrying the bag while on the way to a Malmo casino, which other Swedish media said added to police suspicions that gardening might not have been her top priority. 

According to the report: "The woman claimed that she had no idea that the word "grass" is an established term used to refer to cannabis, explaining that her only knowledge of drugs came from seeing some white powder in a movie."

Sweden has been at the centre of some unusual stories recently, including one in which the Swedish Parliament removed a baroque painting featuring a woman's breasts on the grounds that it offended feminists and Muslim dignitaries

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