Hilarious BBC bias on, wait for it, American versus British teeth!

Only the BBC could run something so hilariously lacking in awareness of their liberal left bias as this

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Perfect teeth
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BBC Nemesis
On 19 February 2014 07:52

If it wasn't for the fact that this is from the BBC, you'd have to assume it was parody. They've just run a 950 word feature on British and American teeth, focusing on the legendary (but correct) observation that British teeth are commonly bent and dirty looking while American teeth tend to be straight and white.

They come up with all sorts of weird and wonderful arguments ranging from dental rip-offs in America producing unnatural looking results to the ludicrous notion that Brits have rotten teeth because they're "more free-spirited, more radical". Of course, the real reason never enters their minds.

Middle aged and elderly Brits often have teeth that look as though they've had a run in with a baseball bat and then been subjected to daily brushing in dog dirt because they're victims of socialised dentistry.

Most people in Britain over the age of 45 had their teeth done by the National Health Service. If some dentist pulled the wrong tooth out and stuck in a brace guaranteed to leave your front teeth backing into your mouth at 45 degrees it wasn't because Brits are "more free spirited" and "radical", it was because the dentist was a state bureaucrat who had no idea what he was doing.

Americans of the same generation almost all went private. Both sides got what they paid for.

Nothing should really surprise us about BBC bias these days. But the serious point here is that it really does demonstrate how deep seated that bias goes. It isn't the kind of bias where an argument is deliberately omitted. It's the kind of bias that is so all consuming that the writers have no idea that they're even omitting something.

And what that means is that the BBC cannot be reformed, it needs to be scrapped. And that's really all there is to it...  

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