Cameron's Christianity in a multi-culti Britain

The letter against David Cameron is just the latest expression of an infantile multi-culturalism that has done terrible damage to social cohesion precisely because it is too weak to create any substantial bonds of identity

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Westminster Abbey
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the commentator
On 21 April 2014 08:14

Perhaps the most striking thing about the 55 "public figures", as the BBC is enthusiastically calling them, who signed a letter of protest against Prime Minister Cameron's observations on how Britain is a Christian country and that we shouldn't be afraid to say it, is that most readers will never have heard of them.

Apart from Polly Toynbee -- whose columns are so poor they're sometimes worth reading just for the comedic value -- and a couple of well known activists like Peter Tatchell, you'll probably look down the list and draw a row of blanks.

Take one look at their letter (to the Telegraph) and it's easy to see why..

"...we object to [Cameron's] characterisation of Britain as a “Christian country” and the negative consequences for politics and society that this engenders.Apart from in the narrow constitutional sense that we continue to have an established Church, Britain is not a “Christian country”. Repeated surveys, polls and studies show that most of us as individuals are not Christian in our beliefs or our religious identities."

Oh dear. First, Britain is a Christian country and that fact won't go away by describing the structure of the British state in terms of "the narrow constitutional" sense. The Church of England is the established church and the Queen is the head of it for reasons which are deeply bound up with the country's political, religious and cultural inheritance.

Neither does the fact that most people don't nowadays go to church on a Sunday mean that Christian values and symbols do not play a vital role in national life. Whenever there's a national tragedy -- the death of Diana for example -- watch how quickly Christianity moves back into centre stage.

Go to any town or village across the country and you'll see that it is the local church, functional or not, that more than anything else defines the local landscape and the visual community of which we are all a part.

The letter against David Cameron is just the latest expression of an infantile multi-culturalism that has done terrible damage to social cohesion precisely because it is too weak to create any substantial bonds of identity.

The writers go on to say: "At a social level, Britain has been shaped for the better by many pre-Christian, non-Christian, and post-Christian forces." Wow. They're really revving up the brain power with that one. You mean there are Hindus and Muslims (that's their key point of course) and Jews and atheists, in Britain? No way!

But it gets stupider still.

"Although it is right to recognise the contribution made by many Christians to social action, it is wrong to try to exceptionalise their contribution when it is equalled by British people of different beliefs."

So, it is wrong to tell the truth? Christianity has been the dominant theme in our religio-cultural life since the sixth century. It is therefore right to "exceptionalise" it. The reason being, it's exceptional.

The shallowness of this open letter against David Cameron is entirely reflective of the shallowness of the politically correct minds that wrote it.

On a final note, it is therefore no surprise at all that the BBC is giving it such extraordinary prominence.

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