Greenpeace’s trail of darkness: developing nations fight back.

Thankfully more people are taking a stand against Greenpeace. Let’s hope this opposition only continues to grow in the name of free trade and freer people.

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Is it time more people took on Greenpeace?
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Raheem Kassam
On 18 October 2011 14:27

Incidentally, Greenpeace just launched its Rainbow Warrior III last week, a ship that costs nearly £21,000,000 funded by Dutch taxpayers, and this organisation’s new vehicle to protest companies everywhere.

It’s no secret that Greenpeace and its other cohorts have made developing countries – places that are resource-rich, socio-economically dynamic, yet still poor – ground zero for their biased environmental campaigns. One may argue that the reason for this is that these countries possess great biodiversity or are home to that last remaining endangered insect that everyone will miss if it goes extinct.

But in reality, Greenpeace loathes growth in developing world economies because stronger industries in Indonesia, China, South Africa or Malaysia offer stiffer competition to firms based in London or Berlin and their host governments – those who happen to fund Greenpeace’s operations.

Thankfully more people are taking a stand against Greenpeace. Let’s hope, moreover, this opposition only continues to grow in the name of free trade and freer people. 

Raheem Kassam is the Executive Editor of The Commentator and Campaigns Director for The Henry Jackson Society. He tweets at @RaheemJKassam.  

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