Al Murray would make a better Prime Minister than Ed Miliband – Poll

The pub landlord Al Murray is preferred as Prime Minister to Labour leader Ed Miliband, according to a new poll from Hotwire

by the commentator on 26 January 2015 11:10

Steven_george-hilley

The UK public are sceptical of Labour leader Ed Miliband’s ability to lead a country after a poll of more than 2,000 people revealed they thought Al Murray would make a better Prime Minister.

Asked ‘Who would make the best Prime Minister?’ 28.7% opted for David Cameron, 26.3% for Al Murray, 14.9% for Ed Miliband, 12.4% for Nigel Farage, 10.5% for Natalie Bennett and 7.2% for Nick Clegg, in a poll carried out by Hotwire, an integrated PR and communications agency.

The fact that one in four respondents think Al Murray would make a better Prime Minister than any of the other party leaders shows just how disillusioned voters have become with mainstream politicians.

Steven George-Hilley, Head of Public Sector at Hotwire said, “These findings underline the extent of voter apathy in Britain, with more people fancying the pub landlord as Prime Minister, instead of Ed Miliband.

“It is vital that the main political parties invest more time engaging with electorate to break down these barriers and restore trust in the political process,” George-Hilley added.  

There’s a new man with a pint in town and he’s proving significantly more popular than his UKIP counterpart. Al Murray, pub landlord, received 26.3% of the vote, way out in front of Farage, who he’s running against in South Thanet. 

It won’t make pretty reading for Clegg or Miliband either, who scooped just 7.2% and 14.9% respectively. Both party leaders are struggling to gain the trust of the electorate, and that showed in the Hotwire poll. 

Hotwire used Google Consumer Surveys to poll 2,162 people from across the United Kingdom. In the run up to the 2012 US Presidential Election, Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight blog for the New York Times found Google Consumer Surveys to be more accurate than the vast majority of US polling 

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus