Only Labour would view dead parents as ‘winning the lottery’

Labour’s message is simple: if your parents work hard, they will punish you for it. If they put some savings aside for you to inherit, it’s like winning the lottery. The idea of middle class families leaping for joy when their parents die because of financial gain seems an odd one, but it defines Ed Miliband’s warped view of aspiration perfectly

Lottery
Labour: if you inherit, you're winning the lottery
Steven_george-hilley
Steven George-Hilley
On 5 February 2015 14:03

This week, it was revealed that former cabinet minister David Blunkett has called for Ed Miliband and the Labour Party to bring back the ‘Death Tax’ on middle-income families.

Apparently we are told that Mr Blunkett has a particular problem when children from wealthy families get inheritance after their parents die, because it’s like winning the lottery.

So Labour’s message is simple: if your parents work hard, they will punish you for it. If they put some savings aside for you to inherit, it is, to repeat, like winning the lottery.

The idea of middle class families leaping for joy when their parents die because of financial gain seems an odd one, but it defines Ed Miliband’s warped view of aspiration perfectly.

This announcement is the latest from Labour in a string of anti-aspiration attacks on the hardworking majority of voters, following some vitriolic criticism of many of our country’s most successful British businesses.

At the moment, even with the current regime, it is the government that wins the lottery when people die, not the family left behind. This makes Labour’s targeting of Britain’s families even more baffling and chaotic.

We’re only a few weeks into the long election campaign and already Ed Miliband’s short-term economic sham is crumbling under scrutiny. The Vice Chancellors of Universities hate his tuition fee policy and the only business leader to back Labour’s economic policy is “Bill somebody” according to shadow chancellor Ed Balls.

The mansion tax plan is viewed as ludicrously complex and counterproductive, and the party’s commitment to high levels of NHS spending without proper reform has left voters spooked.

Lynton Crosby may well be working around the clock on the Conservative election campaign of ‘competence versus chaos,’ but Labour and Ed Miliband seem to be doing all the heavy lifting. Even Ed Balls is helping the Conservatives out with his bacon sandwich tweets.

Labour’s much hyped Obama strategist David Axelrod appears to have done a runner, after billing the party a reported £300,000 for a press release and photo shoot. Meanwhile, according to the latest polling, election chief Douglas Alexander is set to lose his seat, a fact which will doubtless distract him from his job of coordinating Labour’s campaign.

In Prime Ministers Questions on Wednesday, Ed Miliband’s performance was shockingly poor.

His lines didn’t make an impact, his delivery was ineffective and he seemed unprepared for the clash. Compare Miliband’s pitiful performance in PMQs against Tony Blair versus John Major when the young Labour leader was heading for government.

As the incumbent, David Cameron should have been flustered and under pressure because the leader of the opposition was challenging him. This was not the case. David Cameron was steady, confident and in total control.

His delivery was sharp and his rhetoric was brutal and on message. Ed Miliband looked like a rabbit trapped in the headlights.

The long-term economic plan at the heart of David Cameron’s re-election strategy is more than just a buzzword. It is backed up by a string of startlingly clear messages that are hitting home with voters and knocking the confused and disorientated Labour party for six.

With the SNP set to wipe Labour off the map in Scotland, and with Ed Miliband’s appalling public performances, the Conservatives are set for a majority if they continue to perform at this level over the next few weeks.

Never has the campaign theme of ‘competence versus chaos’ been so effective, not at least because it is so true.

Steven George-Hilley is a director at the Parliament Street think tank. He is a Contributing Editor to The Commentator @StevenGeorgia

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