John Major's ill advised gift to Scottish nationalists

Here's what John Major got so disastrously wrong: Instead of concentrating on the dangers of a Left-leaning alliance, he came off as sounding as though the SNP had no legitimate right to get elected to Westminster and then behave like every other party. He effectively made a case for Scotland leaving the union

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If only nobody had been listening today
The_commentator_logo_updated9
the commentator
On 21 April 2015 12:17

Within the unionist camp, if you're an optimist, you'll be hoping that John Major's dreadfully ill-advised speech on Tuesday about the dangers of some form of governing alliance between Labour and the SNP after the general election will be quickly forgotten.

Realists and pessimists will understandably worry that if this sort of thing is not quickly nipped in the bud, there's a real risk of gifting the SNP what they failed to achieve at last year's referendum.

Here's what John Major got so disastrously wrong: Instead of concentrating on the dangers of a Left-leaning alliance of ideologies, he came off as sounding as though the SNP had no legitimate right to get elected to the Westminster parliament and then behave like every other party.

When push comes to shove, that's the case for Scotland leaving the union made by Right-leaning English nationalists who hope that such a move would permanently damage Labour's electoral prospects. It's also perfectly in line with the equal and opposite case made by Scottish nationalists.

You can't have it both ways. If Scotland is a vital component of the union, its elected representatives are free to pursue what they perceive to be in their interests.

Conservatives have every right to flag up the prospect of some form of Labour-SNP pact on political grounds -- because it would ruin the economy, harm our national defences, prevent a referendum on the EU, for example.

But the moment you cross the line into questioning a Westminster party's legitimacy you risk blowing the lid off Pandora's box.

This is really easy to understand. Which then raises the question of which clowns advised him to make the speech?

True to form when he runs into problems, perhaps he'll blame those famous "bastards".

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