Al Quds march of shame: Britain still wobbles on terror

Jeremy Corbyn is well known for his old friendship with the Jew hating terrorists of Hezbollah. But blame for the shameful Al Quds march rests squarely with the Tory government whose prevarication about Islamist terror remains disturbingly resilient

Al_quds_march
A march of shame
Bbjm-157
Richard Ferrer
On 13 June 2018 10:33

Last year, days after genocidal jihadists slaughtered eight people on London Bridge, the Government allowed the genocidal jihadist flag of Hezbollah to be waved a few miles down the road at the Al Quds Day rally.

On Sunday, days after launching its new counter-terrorism strategy, the Government let the event take place again, with the terror group’s yellow machine gun banner waved freely from Mayfair to Downing Street.

Mixed messages come no more scrambled than that.

I began my Al Quds Day [it gets earlier every year] in the testosterone-fuelled Hezbollah end. Event organiser Nazim Ali, the head of the Islamic Human Rights Commission, who blames the Grenfell fire on Zionists, held court on a scaffolding platform above the melee, resplendent in top hat and tails.

An overcompensating masked youth waved a Hezbollah flag attached to a proud 30-foot pole. The gun flag was also draped around children, while smaller paper versions were adorably stuck to the side of prams.

Sheikh Shaykh Mohammad Saeed Bahmanpour called for Israel to be “wiped off the map”. A charmer in a Celtic top – the number 11 on the back comprised of two maps of Israel – ranted into a speaker covered in Scottish independence stickers about Glasgow standing with Gaza. Neturei Karta burned an Israeli flag. Someone shoved a ‘Zionism=Racism” sign in my hand, which I shiftily placed on the ground hoping nobody from the Zionist Federation had spotted me [Some of my best friends are Jewish. Honest].

Vicar Stephen Sizer scaled the scaffolding to tell everyone what a unique pain in the arse Israel is. Quiz time: The good reverend suspects A) 9/11 may have been an Israeli plot. B) Ant wasn’t really drunk, it was the Zionists trying to bring down Ant And Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway. C) The Jews forced Heinz to rename its salad cream. Answer: A [B and C pending].

Yes indeed. The Al Quds milkshake brings all the loons to the yard. Rotten low-hanging fruit loop who know as sure as they know their own names that Jews are PLOTTING WORLD DOMINATION. (Note to self – running low on biscuits for Sunday’s PWD meeting – get Hobnobs).

Over on the pro-Israel side the chat was more about restaurants than revolution. More Bagel Street than Cable Street. Is Fortnum & Mason walkable? Who’s tried the new Zest Bevis Marks meat restaurant? And, while we’re here, why is that rabble over the road allowed to wave the flag of a group that wants us dead?

The simple answer is the Government has banned Hezbollah’s military but not political wing. Both have the same machine gun flag. The Arab League, even Hezbollah itself, makes no distinction. And Fortnums is a five minute stroll down Piccadilly.

After headline act Maajid Nawaz spoke about his transition from the young jihadi who addressed the Al Quds rally in 2006 to the reforming hero we adore today, we all sang the Hatikvah and God Save The Queen. I hadn’t heard the national anthem sung that passionately since the Boxing Day Ashes Test of 2010.

Then both demos were on the move, down Half Moon Street into Curzon Street, separated by police cordon, CST volunteers and Islamic Human Rights’ private security – but not before the Al Quders were delayed for a good hour by lawyer Mark Lewis, staging a Tianamen Square sit-in in his wheelchair.

Jeremy Corbyn gets it fairly in the neck over his ease around anti-Semites (He’s addressed the Al Quds rally. Obviously), but the responsibility for this shabby shindig is entirely on Conservative shoulders. Ask Number 10 how the Hezbollah rally does not breach the Terrorism Act and you’ll be referred to Home Office who will bounce you to the Metropolitan Police who will ping you to the London Mayor’s office who will refer you to Number 10. It’s a dizzy mess.

More than 14,000 people have signed a Parliamentary Petition calling for Hezbollah to, finally, be proscribed in full. That number of signatures now requires a government response – one that must surely signal an end to a hate fest that demeans our nation.

Richard Ferrer is the Editor of the Jewish News. He’s also worked at the Daily Mirror, Daily Mail, and edited the Boston Jewish Advocate. Follow him on Twitter @RichFerrer

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