Broken Politics: Liam Fox’s word of warning to wavering MPs

The Secretary of State for International Trade, in what could be considered a warning to those MPs yet to make up their mind on whether to support the Prime Minister’s plan B this coming Tuesday explained what he considered the stakes to be.

by Patrick Sullivan, Political Editor on 26 January 2019 01:51

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The Rt. Hon. Dr Liam Fox MP was upbeat about Britain’s prospects post Brexit, this week whilst in scenic Davos. The President of the Board of Trade is at the World Economic Forum promoting this country’s interests at this annual gathering of global, financial and political leaders.

In addition to forecasting a bright future for Britain, the cabinet minister did have words of warning for home grown politicians: deliver on Brexit or risk the fragmentation of our politics. Speaking to EuroNews, Dr Fox explained why in his opinion a deal would eventually pass the House of Commons.

As a member of the Prime Minister’s inner circle, Dr Fox was able to give EuroNews his inside opinion of the mood within Westminster. He was confident that a deal would eventually be reached which would pass the House of Commons in time for Britain to depart on 29th March as currently scheduled, saying: “Well for the last week or so I’ve detected a growing willingness of my colleagues on both sides of the house and amongst those who voted leave and remain to come to an agreement, and I think there’s a growing understanding that it is in everyone’s interest to do so.”

Furthermore, the Secretary of State for International Trade, in what could be considered a warning to those MPs yet to make up their mind on whether to support the Prime Minister’s plan B this coming Tuesday explained what he considered the stakes to be.

According to Dr Fox, at risk was no less than the entire break down of Britain’s two-party system: “We have avoided the fragmentation of politics that’s occurred in many European continental countries. At the last election, Britain’s two main parties got over 80% of the vote, far more than has happened in any recent European election. I want to avoid that fragmentation and the best way to avoid that is for parliament to deliver on its promise on the referendum result.” Seeking to hammer home this extremely important point, he later told CNBC : “One of the biggest problems there would be, would be to tell the British people that they had voted for something two and a half years ago and Parliament, which promised to give it to them, was still denying it. I think there you would get a dislocation of the political process of Parliament from the voters in the way that you’ve seen the sort of fragmentation of continental European politics. I don’t want to see that in Britain.”

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