I must ask: are these people serious?

Harry Todd warns against listening to the nonsense about No Deal being pedaled by the latest incarnation of Project Fear.

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Harry Todd
On 16 September 2019 09:35

Some time ago I looked at twitter and discovered I had been tagged into a post containing a video of a man going through the fruit and veg aisle at his local supermarket. The man proceeded to read out the country of origin for the various things he held up. “Mexico,” he exclaimed. “Peru,” He commented. “Argentina,” he said before finally asking (in coarse language) why we needed the European Union for food when a majority of our produce came from nations far removed from Europe.

 

The discussions post-Yellowhammer reminded me of this video after hearing several UK grocers were unhappily planning on airlifting in food after a No Deal Brexit and I must ask: are these people serious?

 

Airlifting goods into the country is a perfectly acceptable part of any supply chain and yet these grocers seem to believe if the kale or olive oil hasn’t come in by boat it is some great personal failure on their part. On top of this, they seem so convinced by their arguments they are willing to risk the public panic buying by splashing their fears all over the media.

 

I also find this same argument applies to the potential shortage of medicines. Britain has hundreds of pharmaceutical manufacturers and no reason to think airlifting medicines to our hospitals is anything radical or improper. In fact, in many instances, it may speed up the delivery of vital medicines particularly in rural inland areas.

 

More realistically I believe these grocers are, unwittingly, stoking these fears as part of a coordinated and surgical strike. Dominic Grieve and Jeremy Corbyn were very persistent with their plan to force the Government to publish the Yellowhammer documents and not the series of documents relating to Brexit preparations because they knew they would be taken out of context.

 

A no-deal Brexit is not a catastrophe, Yellowhammer is not a prediction, and the musings of grocers shouldn't be taken as meaning there will be a shortage of anything – especially not bruised egos of those predicting them! Instead of bowing to attempts to extrapolate worst-case scenario due diligence into yet more Project Fear, the UK must push forward and Get Britain Out of the EU on October 31st.

 

Harry Todd is a Senior Research Executive at the grassroots cross-party campaign Get Britain Out.

 

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